The Brotherband by John Flanagan

We are enjoying John Flanagan as an author and using the interviews on YouTube to get acquainted with this author’s motivation in writing for teens.

Our library already has the complete set of the Ranger’s Apprentice and we thought another series by this author might be of interest to our readers. Bullseye.

We now have the complete set of The Brotherband books.

Here he explains the difference between Viking and Skandian.

Follow-on videos have him talking about his series.

Long ago and far away, it seems that his own son was discouraged because of his unimpressive stature. Dad to the rescue – to write stories for his son about smaller boys being successful. One of his stories got out to a larger audience and the rest is history.

Of course at this point, he has fans.

See above his Grijze Jager Dag appearance.

Popular on audiobook and ebook as well. Enjoy the adventure!

John Harrison and the Problem of Longitude

History of the Harrison clock

Currently reading “Longitude” by Dava Sobel and gaining insight into the fascinating story of dead reckoning navigation and its deadly results. As a consequence, the Longitude Act sought a better way of determining a ship’s position in the sea.

I like this video because I wanted to see one of John Harrison’s chronometers in action. There is more history here than I had already learned from the book, and I saw his early clocks, wooden clocks, clocks without lubrication; fascinating to the mechanical side of my interests.

John Harrison and the problem of Longitude

All Roads Lead to Rome

All Roads Lead to Rome” is a proverb of medieval origin that may refer to: A proverb in a number of languages referring to Roman roads, especially the Milliarium Aureum (per Wikipedia).

The Milliarium Aureum in itself is quite interesting, but today I’ve uncovered a current day project that is just as fascinating to those of us living post Roman Empire.

The Roman Roads Diagrams Project

https://sashamaps.net/docs/maps/roman-roads-index/

Sasha Trubetskoy of SashaMaps.net has been busy documenting a series of maps that appear as modern-day transit maps of the Roman roads.

“The Roman roads diagram project is a series of maps driven by an unconventional idea: what if we represented Ancient Rome’s famed road network in the style of a modern transit map?”

writes Sasha

https://sashamaps.net/docs/maps/roman-roads-index/

What a captivating project sure to tempt any budding cartologist.

I cannot include any of the maps in this post because of copyright protocols, but clicking on any of the pertinent links in this post will take you right to the maps.

Image by Valter Cirillo from Pixabay