The Brotherband by John Flanagan

We are enjoying John Flanagan as an author and using the interviews on YouTube to get acquainted with this author’s motivation in writing for teens.

Our library already has the complete set of the Ranger’s Apprentice and we thought another series by this author might be of interest to our readers. Bullseye.

We now have the complete set of The Brotherband books.

Here he explains the difference between Viking and Skandian.

Follow-on videos have him talking about his series.

Long ago and far away, it seems that his own son was discouraged because of his unimpressive stature. Dad to the rescue – to write stories for his son about smaller boys being successful. One of his stories got out to a larger audience and the rest is history.

Of course at this point, he has fans.

See above his Grijze Jager Dag appearance.

Popular on audiobook and ebook as well. Enjoy the adventure!

Superpowers

What if your superpower is drawing really big pictures? You might end up being part of an exhibit just as Ron Kaskuk of Athens, Illinois, demonstrates here.

Mr. Kaskuk is a professional graffiti artist adept at covering large spaces.

Enjoy!

Tap “Watch on Facebook” to see this incredibly fun–and short–video 🙂

John Harrison and the Problem of Longitude

History of the Harrison clock

Currently reading “Longitude” by Dava Sobel and gaining insight into the fascinating story of dead reckoning navigation and its deadly results. As a consequence, the Longitude Act sought a better way of determining a ship’s position in the sea.

I like this video because I wanted to see one of John Harrison’s chronometers in action. There is more history here than I had already learned from the book, and I saw his early clocks, wooden clocks, clocks without lubrication; fascinating to the mechanical side of my interests.

John Harrison and the problem of Longitude

Going Virtual in a non-Virtual World

Yesterday, the school went to a soft closure involving half our students. Some of the kids were boarding the bus (to go home for 2 weeks of home learning) with the comment that they have no internet at home.

There are always ways around this if you have transportation to the public library and the public library remains open. This is still a challenge in our rural area since the library does not have regular hours.

In the short term, many of our students will once again bend over backwards to stay up to date on their assignments. Our teachers will be doing their very best to communicate through all these challenges.

In the long term, some of our families could benefit from grants like this:

https://www.strongfamilies.idaho.gov/

https://www.strongfamilies.idaho.gov/

Schools are doing their best to get the word out. Ironically, those without the internet don’t see the offer for internet help, therefore we’ve tried to send fliers to everyone.

Another issue is that many rural locations just do not have any access to the internet or their access is very limited. We are used to this, but when several kids in a family need internet access to get the most out of their classes, the technology hurdle becomes daunting.

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